STEMpunk™ programming research and development

Projects are programs we are working on that either haven't quite solidified or are still a work in progress. Once completed these projects become part of our growing Programs Catalog.


Turing Tumble: 
Journey to the Moon

Her Majesty's Extraordinary Adventurers are back, and this time the sky's the limit - literally. Prussia's Baron von Vaderstein has discovered a working spaceship buried at the base of the Giza pyramids and has used it to launch himself on a journey to the vessel's ancient point of origin - the Moon! The Adventurers have uncovered  a spaceship of their own, a twin to the first in every way but one - it's mechanical computer brain is broken. Can the Adventurers get the ship's marvelous alien Mechabrain working again to undertake their own voyage? If so, can they catch up to the Baron, or perhaps even beat him to the Moon? And what awaits them all when they reach the ships' ancient Lunar home? This program features Paul Boswell's invention, the Turing Tumble, a set of Turing-complete marble-driven computers that teach both mechanical logic and the processes of modern digital computing.

From Giza to the Moon - STEMpunk

Vintage Video Editing: The Then & Now of media Post-Production

Part demonstration, part hands-on workshop showing how film movies were taken, processed, viewed, and edited along with hands-on experience doing actual editing with a vintage home editing kit. While working with the old-school technology we will simultaneously do the same editing steps with software on a computer for a stark comparison of just how good people have it these days.


Vintage Film Editing - STEMpunk

Home Computing 1965: Coding & Gaming Before the Microchip

Given that the smallest computer available in the 1960s had a price tag of  $18,000 ($140,000 in today's dollars), required a small cargo van to move (by the time you included interface terminal, storage, and output), and had RAM measured in 12 bit word lengths (24 total characters), how did home computer coding and games work in the Age of Aquarius?  The answer is that they used mechanical and basic electrical equivalents of the same Boolean logic and Binary systems that run today's computers. This program will explore several of the most popular coding tools and games of the period and provide hands-on play with them.

The Amazing Dr. Nim - STEMpunk

Simple Machines: Compound Constructions, Humorous Combinations 

The oldest and simplest components behind even the most complex mechanical machines are: Wheels, Axles, Inclined Planes, Levers, Pulleys, and Screws. Like all machines, at their heart they use mechanical advantage to multiply force to do work. They also happen to be the building blocks of the brilliant designs of Rube Goldberg, master of needlessly complex, light-hearted contraptions that accomplish the silliest of tasks. We'll learn how to analyze and construct our own simple and compound machines from cardboard and other basic materials and then combine them into our own Rube Goldberg designs.

Simple Machines: Compound Constructions & Humorous Combinations - STEMpunk

Drawing Machines: An Intersect of Art & Engineering

Delve into this playful exploration of how artists and engineers have sought to capture the the most human of all activities - Art. Study past and present mechanical attempts to capture the artistic process in the operations of simple and complex machines before building  your own art-making automation.

Drawing Machines: The Unexpected Intersect of Art & Engineering - STEMpunk

Your Project

Do you have an idea for a Program that we could develop for you in our STEMpunk style? Do you see something here that inspires you? Contact us and let us know. Consider becoming a Partner for our mutual success and check out our Testimonials to see the successes we have had in the past. While you're at it, why not take a few moments to learn more about Who We Are and What We Do?

Your Project - STEMpunk


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